Medical Marijuana – Cannabis Medicine Health Guide

A Comprehensive Guide To Medical Marijuana

There once was a time when marijuana was almost considered a bad word. The negative connotations were everywhere and stereotypes abounded. Today, with the backup of science and a shift in cultural awareness, marijuana is not only more accepted, it is also completely legal in many states across America. With this in mind, and as laws continue to change, it is important to stay up to date on what it is being used for and which states will allow you to use marijuana in a medical fashion.

A Brief History of Marijuana as Medicine in the United States

From the beginning, we would like to point out that the FDA has fought the legislation for Medical Marijuana. Similar to their decrees on health supplements, as of 2015, the FDA has stood firm and has not approved or recognized marijuana officially as a medicine. That being said, the plant is being used both in research and practice for medicinal purposes.

In America, marijuana (cannabis sativa) was documented and grown when settlers began creating farms in Jamestown, Virginia. There are historical references in our country for marijuana being used for medical purposes such as the 1850 edition of the United State Pharmacopeia that detailed herbal remedies that were said to assist with ailments. So, the concept of Americans using marijuana for healing isn’t anything new.

In fact, marijuana being illegal is a relatively new development as it was legal in the states until 1970. This was when the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act (aka Federal Controlled Substance Act) changed the playing field for how drugs were categorized and what was legal not only for the common person to buy and sell, but it also dictated what doctors could and could not prescribe to patients.

Marijuana was categorized as a Schedule I Controlled Substance, which meant that it was from this time forward, illegal for primary care providers to prescribe the plant (in any natural form) to their patients.

Since the mid-80s, a few states but namely California, have fought for the right to use marijuana for medicinal purposes and the process to make it legal and accessible again has been a long haul. Today, the fight is still going but in many states there is easy access to marijuana, some states even allowing it to be legal for recreational purposes as well.

Breaking Down the Pot Plant

Although marijuana is considered a single species Cannabis Sativa, there are at least three distinct varieties of the plant; Cannabis Sativa, Cannabis Indica, and the most rare Cannabis Ruderalis. It is a flowering plant that grows in most countries of the world, that has been harvested for over 4000 years for its flowers and leaves that contain potent and psychedelic and analgesic (pain relieving) compounds.

While there are 483 identifiable chemical constituents, and at least 85 different cannabinoids known to exist within marijuana, the two most abundant are tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). Different treatments use different parts of the plant, therefore it is important to understand the difference between them before you delve into further information.

Tetrahydrocannabinol or THC

THC is the primary psychoactive component of the marijuana plant, and has been one of the reasons it has been cultivated for centuries. While scientist now believe that the marijuana plant developed THC as a defense against natural predators such as harmful insects and herbivores, it has now become the source for many scientific discoveries.

Marijuana products that are high in THC are primarily prescribed to patients seeking relief from neuropathic pain that can come with conditions such as:

  •  Multiple sclerosis
  •  Spinal cord injury
  •  Some types of cancer
  •  HIV/AIDS
  •  Chemotherapy treatment

Generally, THC can be found in a variety of prescriptions including smokables and edibles.

Cannabidiol or CBD

CBD is one of the active 85 cannabinoids identified within the marijuana plant, and accounts for up to 40% of the plants extract. In recent studies it has been found that CBD extract works as an effective anticonvulsant which can be useful for the treatment of epilepsy and seizures.

Additionally CBD has been look to for a treatment for a number of mental health disorders due to its effect as a anxiolytic, which inhibits anxiety, and works as a mood stabilizer. Some disorders that have been found to be helped by the incorporation of medical marijuana with treatment are:

  •  Generalised social anxiety disorder
  •  Bipolar disorder
  •  Borderline personality
  •  PTSD

Strains and Properties

Medical marijuana is bred to be effective against certain ailments and symptoms, depending on what is being treated. For this reason there are thousands of different strains of plants, each with a varying range of THC and CBD. Most plants are bred to have very high CBD contents, but the amount and kinds of THC can vary greatly.

Since the two compounds each are beneficial for a wide array of disorders, there is no “one right mix” for everybody. Your provider will discuss the kinds of marijuana with you and tell you which type to get from the dispensary. When you are at your dispensary, they will usually have multiple flavors and types that are made up of the correct THC and CBD mixtures that are recommended by your physician.

If you are unsure about what variations of medical marijuana are available to you, check with your local dispensaries and ask about their specific strains. They will be able to tell you the kinds that they have and the percentages of both THC and CBD within the marijuana blends.

Is Medical Marijuana Right For You?

Marijuana has become a legal again for treatment for a variety of ailments in a number of states, and now you may be wondering what it is and if it’s right for you. Below, you will find a number of common diagnosis that have medical marijuana has been shown to be beneficial. Of course, before you decide to take ANY medication, you should always speak with your primary care provider regarding medical conditions and the prescription of medication and this guide does not constitute as medical advice.

There are steps that need to be taken before you can get yourself marijuana, for medical purposes. In most states, you are required to have a prescription and you can’t just go anywhere. Rather, there are steps that you must take in order to be able to purchase legally.

1. Talk to your doctor – You will need a prescription, which means that a doctor will need to approve your condition and verify that you have a legitimate use for medical marijuana.

2. Take your prescription (recommendation) to a dispensary – You must buy through a dispensary as they are regulated as an “authorized seller” and will provide you with medical grade medication.

What is Medical Marijuana Good For?

Recent polls in the New England Journal of Medicine has shown that 76% of 1,446 doctors polled are in favor of using marijuana as a medical treatment. In states where it is legal, it is generally not difficult to find a doctor that is willing to prescribe the drug. In fact, it has been noted that it is becoming easier in many states to get a medical marijuana prescription filled versus a narcotic for pain relief such as hydrocodone or oxycodone.

We have broken down for you, many of the common conditions or symptoms that marijuana can be prescribed for.

Anti-Nausea and Stimulating Appetite

Nausea and Loss of Appetite can come with many ailments, including ulcers, gallbladder disease, HIV/AIDS and chemotherapy treatment for cancer, and doctors around the world have been prescribing Medicinal Marijuana for it for years. Tetrahydrocannabinol or THC, the primary psychoactive compound in marijuana has shown in multiple studies to help reduce nausea and stimulate appetite in AIDS patients, as well as people going through chemotherapy.

It has also been show in recent studies the cannabinoids that naturally occur within the body help suppress nausea, and the intake of medical marijuana during episodes of nausea can effectively relieve and reduce those symptoms. The same study also came to the conclusion that inhaled medical marijuana was not only comparable to synthetic alternatives, but superior.

ADHD

ADHD or Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder is a disorder that is most commonly marked by Impulsiveness, Hyperactivity and Distractibility. ADD or Attention Deficit Disorder is similar to ADHD but lacks its hyperactive component.

One of the main factors believed to contribute to ADHD is deficiency in dopamine, which is a chemical neurotransmitter that assists in cognitive functions like attention and memory. When you first think of marijuana you probably don’t think of focus or concentration, but recent studies have shown that medical marijuana’s ability to correct dopamine deficiency in patients can help mitigate the effects of ADD/ADHD and promote focus without stimulants.

Anxiety

According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America Anxiety Disorders affect over 40 million adults in the united states, making it the most common mental illness in the US. Additionally they also stated “Anxiety disorders are highly treatable, yet only about one-third of those suffering receive treatment.”

Cancer

One of the first things medical marijuana was prescribed for in recent history is for assistance with cancer treatment, due to its anti-nausea and appetite inducing effects. In a recent statement from the National Cancer Institute they stated “Cannabis has been shown to kill cancer cells in the laboratory”. This is a broad statement and much more research is needed to know for sure exactly what the full scope of possibilities when it comes to cancer and medical marijuana.

Anti-Tumor Benefits Of Medicinal THC and CBD

Based on recent scientific studies, Medical News Today reports that THC could be used to decrease tumor growth in patients. The research found that with medical marijuana treatments that cancer cells in the brain could be killed off in a process called, “autogaphy”. The information is still being researched, but it is likely that more positive correlations will be found for tumors and marijuana for medical purposes. This is on the heels of the beneficial effects that medical marijuana has been showing in other areas of cancer research as well.

Chemotherapy And Medical Marijuana

One of the earliest forms of legal medical marijuana in the united states is Marinol, a pill form of THC that has been prescribed to patients since 1985 to help reduce nausea and loss of appetite associated with chemotherapy. Additionally some studies have come to the conclusion that the addition of cannabinoids to already existing chemotherapy treatments may increase their effectiveness.

Childhood Seizures and Epilepsy

According to the Epilepsy Foundation “Epilepsy is the 4th most common neurological problem – only migraine, stroke and Alzheimer’s disease occurs more frequently.” and more and more doctors are now recommending medicinal marijuana, specifically CBD oil or extract for the treatment of epilepsy.

The reason this prescription is being recommended more frequently is due to CBD’s effect as an anticonvulsant, which can drastically reduce the severity of seizures as well as their frequency. Additionally due to CBD’s non narcotic formula it is now being looked into for the treatment of Dravet syndrome, a form of seizure that affects 1/16,000 children in america each year.

Crohn’s Disease

Crohn’s Disease causes pain and discomfort to the gastrointestinal tract. While medical marijuana is still being researched for restorative properties, the drug does help with many of the major side effects including nausea and vomiting. Additionally, due to the pain that comes with this disease and the fact that it targets the stomach and intestines, eating can become quite problematic. Medical marijuana can be helpful in easing the pain during eating.

Chronic Arthritis

By the year 2030 it’s expected that 67 million americans will be diagnosed with Chronic Arthritis. Because of medical marijuana is now prescribed for both anti-inflammation and full body pain relief, it’s becoming a top alternative to addictive narcotics and other harmful medications.

Chronic Pain

As shown in a recent study by the National Institute of Health (NIH) it was shown that nearly 50 million Americans suffer from daily chronic pain, and more and more of them are now being prescribed Medical Marijuana.

HIV / AIDS

Marijuana has been known to be helpful for patients with HIV / AIDS for years because it is so beneficial to symptoms that people commonly have during the different stages of the illness. Not only does it promote hunger, which can trigger patients to eat more or put on weight, it can also ease with the mental health side effects that can also be present, such as insomnia and anxiety. However, in 2009, researchers found that THC taken once per day over the course of 17 months to monkeys, they showed a dramatic decrease in damage to the stomach, which is a common spot that infection occurs due to immune deficiency responses.

Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

Multiple sclerosis or MS is an autoimmune disease that affects the central nervous system of more than 2.5 million people worldwide. Some of the most common symptoms of MS are; Fatigue, vision problems, vertigo or dizziness, problems with balance and coordination, tingling or numbness, and muscle weakness or spasms.

In a 2014 a systematic review by the American Academy of Neurology found that usage of orally dosed marijuana extract was effective at improving patients experiences with spasticity, and that it was effective at treating full body pain and painful spasms associated with multiple sclerosis.

Pain Relief

One of the most common reasons that people seek out treatment with marijuana is because of the need for pain control. In a recent study published in Pain Medicine it was concluded that “Natural cannabis contains 5-15% THC but also includes multiple other therapeutic cannabinoids, all working in concert to produce analgesia…” which is the inability to feel pain. And in another study it has been shown that Marijuana was an effective alternative to opioids and NSAIDs for the relief of chronic neuropathic pain.

PTSD

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder or PTSD is defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ED.) as “the development of charistic symptoms following exposure to extreme traumatic stressor…” and according to recent studies it is estimated to affect 8.2% of the population of the united states. Some of the most common symptoms of PTSD are persistent, intrusive recollections or re-experiences of the original experience (flashbacks), and sleep disturbances, mainly insomnia and debilitating nightmares, which can be experienced for years or decades after.

Due to PTSD’s natural resistance to conventional antidepressants and hypnotics, doctors are now turning medicinal marijuana as well as Nabilone, a synthetic form of THC, to help reduce the frequency and intensity of Nightmares, Insomnia and Daytime flashbacks associated with PTSD.

Spinal Cord Injury

CBD and THC has been shown to be highly effective against nerve pain and therefore it can be helpful when there is a spinal cord injury. While there is no proof of conclusive regenerative properties for injuries to the spinal cord specifically, there is also promising research that has been done indicating that medicinal marijuana may be able to be used to encourage nerve regeneration.

Marijuanas Many Forms

Although most people think of smoking when they think of marijuana, that’s not the only alternative for people looking to marijuana as an option for medication. Here is a listing of some of the many ways available to consume cannabis for medicinal purposes.

Sativas

Cannabis Sativa, one of two primary varieties of marijuana, is noted for it most noted effects on thoughts and feelings. Sativa strains of marijuana primarily produce stimulated feelings, and most patients prefer its use in the daytime.

The primary effects of Sativa use are:

  •  Feelings of stimulation or having more energy
  •  Increased sense of well-being, creativity, focus
  •  Increases appetite
  •  Reduces feelings of depression
  •  Relieves nausea, headaches, and migraines
  •  Some noted side effects from Sativa use are:
  •  Increased feelings of anxiety
  •  Increased feelings of paranoia

Indicas

Cannabis Indica, one of the two primary varieties of marijuana, is noted for its effects on the body. it tends to produce feelings of sedation and relaxation.

The primary effects of Sativa use are:

  •  Reduction of stress, and provides feelings of relaxation
  •  Helps users sleep, and increases sleep quality and duration
  •  Relaxes muscles
  •  Reduces the frequency of muscle spasms and seizures
  •  Reduces feelings of nausea while increasing appetite
  •  Reduces pain and inflammation
  •  Relieves headaches and migraines

Some noted side effects from Indica use are:

  •  Feelings of tiredness
  •  Clouded thoughts

Hybrids

Hybrids or strains are when two or more varieties of marijuana have been crossed together to produce unique strains. Due to grower and scientific interests there are now thousands of strains of marijuana in the world. Because of this you will need to consult a marijuana expert at a dispensary when choosing hybrids.

Marijuana Extracts and Other Products

While the dried flower or bud from the mature female marijuana plant is the most common form of marijuana consumed in the United States, there are other alternative forms available.

Extracts or concentrates are are produced from the cannabinoid-rich glandular trichomes that are found throughout the plant, primarily within the cannabis flowers.

Kief

Kief is a light green to yellow powder made from the collected trichomes of marijuana buds and leaves.Typically smoked in powder form or mixed with marijuana buds. Is the primary component of Hashish

Hashish

Hashish or Hash is produced by compressing collected trichomes. It contains all of the same ingredients as marijuana but typically in higher concentrations.

Hash Oil

Hash oil is a mixture of essential oils of cannabinoid extracted through the use of ethanol or other solvents, and then evaporated. Hash oil tends to have a high concentration of THC.

Marijuana Edibles

Marijuana can be effective when consumed orally, either brewed into a tea or added to cakes, dressings and other foods. In order for marijuana to be effective in food, it must be heated enough to convert tetrahydrocannabinolic acid into THC. When consumed orally marijuana usually has a considerably longer onset time and duration due to slower absorption of cannabinoids.

Tincture

Tinctures use grain alcohol to extract and isolate cannabinoids. Used in tiny doses administered via eye dropper orally, and absorbed through the mouth.

Spray

Sublingual sprays is another method of using tinctures. Applied by spraying under the tongue.

Marijuana Topicals

Penetrating topical cream combined with cannabinoids can be applied directly to the skin to help with many conditions such as allergic skin reactions, muscle strain, and inflammation.

Dronabinol (Marinol)

Dronabinol is a synthetic version of THC suspended in sesame oil. It is commonly prescribed to patients going through chemotherapy that suffer from nausea and loss of appetite.

Sativex

Sativex is a prescribed oral spray made primarily from THC and CBD suspended in ethanol. It is primarily prescribed to patients suffering from a variety of ailments including MS, Cancer, Neuropathic Pain, Spasticity, and Overactive Bladder.

State by State Guide To Medical Marijuana

Although marijuana is still technically illegal on the federal level in the United States, many individual states in the last few years have legalized marijuana for medical purposes or even recreational use. This guide provides a list of each state’s laws on marijuana, as well as what qualifying conditions may qualify you for medical marijuana treatments.

Alabama

Medical marijuana is not expressly legal in the state of Alabama. Only cannabis extracts that are high in CBD and low in THC strains are allowed in this state. The law only allows for the patient to not be prosecuted if they are using “non-intoxicating CBD oil” as prescribed in the measure for Carly’s Law, which was signed into law in 2014 by Gov. Bentley of Alabama. The measure does not allow for provisions that would be reflective of cultivation or distribution.

Qualifying conditions:

● Severe debilitating epileptic conditions as detailed by a physician

Alaska

In Alaska, you can have up to one ounce of marijuana for medicinal purposes, which can be attained through either home cultivation or a caregiver.

Qualifying conditions :

  •  Cachexia (wasting syndrome)
  •  Cancer
  •  Glaucoma
  •  HIV/AIDS, Multiple Sclerosis
  •  Muscle Spasms
  •  Nausea
  •  Pain
  •  Seizures

Arizona

In Arizona, you can have up to two and a half ounces of marijuana for medicinal purposes, which can be attained through caregivers, state-licensed dispensaries or home cultivation. They have specific requirements for home cultivation based on your distance from the nearest dispensary. You must live more than 25 miles from a dispensary and you are not allowed more than 12 plants within an “enclosed, locked facility”.

Qualifying conditions :

  •  Cachexia (wasting syndrome)
  •  Cancer
  •  Glaucoma
  •  HIV/AIDS, Multiple Sclerosis
  •  Muscle Spasms
  •  Nausea
  •  Pain
  •  Seizures

Arkansas

This state currently does not allow any form of medicinal or recreational marijuana use.

California

For medical marijuana in the state of California, there are no specific limits pertaining to the possession. Specifications are listed for home cultivation, and you can also purchase your marijuana through dispensaries or caregivers.

Qualifying conditions:

  •  HIV/AIDS
  •  Anorexia
  •  Arthritis
  •  Cachexia (wasting syndrome)
  •  Cancer
  •  Chronic pain
  •  Glaucoma
  •  Intense nausea
  •  Persistent Muscle Spasms
  •  Migraines
  •  Regularly occurring muscle spasms (as well as those caused by multiple sclerosis)
  •  Varying types of seizure (including those related to epilepsy)
  •  Any chronic medical condition which strongly limits your ability to conduct one or more major functions of day to day life

Colorado

In Colorado, you are allowed up to two ounces of medical marijuana, which can be attained through through dispensaries or caregivers.

Qualifying Conditions:

  •  Cachexia (wasting syndrome)
  •  Cancer
  •  Glaucoma
  •  HIV/AIDS, Multiple Sclerosis
  •  Muscle Spasms
  •  Nausea
  •  Pain
  •  Seizures

Connecticut

In Connecticut, you are allowed one month supply of medical marijuana, which can be attained through through dispensaries or caregivers.

Qualifying conditions:

  •  Cachexia
  •  Cancer
  •  Crohn's disease
  •  Epilepsy
  •  Glaucoma
  •  HIV or AIDS
  •  Intractable spasticity
  •  Multiple Sclerosis
  •  Parkinson's Disease
  •  Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  •  Other medical conditions may be approved by the Department of Consumer Protection

As of 2016, he following conditions have been approved by the programs physicians' board, however they are awaiting regulatory finalization.

  •  Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  •  Fabry disease
  •  Post-surgical back pain with a condition called chronic radiculopathy
  •  Post laminectomy syndrome
  •  Severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis
  •  Sickle cell disease
  •  Ulcerative colitis

Delaware

In Delaware, you are allowed up to six ounces of medical marijuana, which can be attained through through dispensaries or caregivers.

Qualifying conditions:

  •  Cachexia (wasting syndrome)
  •  Cancer
  •  Glaucoma
  •  HIV/AIDS, Multiple Sclerosis
  •  Muscle Spasms
  •  Nausea
  •  Pain
  •  Seizures

District of Columbia (DC)

Has full legalization with adults 21 and over allowed to possess up to 2 ounces of marijuana for personal use. Additionally, doctors in the District of Columbia are allowed to prescribe medicinal marijuana for any “debilitating condition” that they deem necessary.

There is no specific qualifying list and it is up to the discretion of your primary care provider.

Florida

Medical marijuana is not expressly legal in the state of Florida, however there is a medical CBD statute in the state. Please see state website for the most up to date information on medical CBD laws.

Qualifying conditions:

● Severe debilitating epileptic conditions as detailed by a physician

Georgia

Medical marijuana is not expressly legal in the state of Georgia, however there is a medical CBD statute in the state. Please see state website for the most up to date information on medical CBD laws.

Qualifying conditions:

● Severe debilitating epileptic conditions as detailed by a physician

Hawaii

In Hawaii, you are allowed up to four ounces of useable medical marijuana, which can be attained through through dispensaries or caregivers. You may cultivate up to seven marijuana plants at a time for personal use with doctor’s prescription.

Qualifying conditions:

  •  Cachexia
  •  Cancer
  •  Chronic pain
  •  Crohn's disease
  •  Glaucoma
  •  HIV or AIDS
  •  Nausea
  •  Persistent muscle spasms
  •  Post traumatic stress
  •  Seizures

Idaho

This state currently does not allow any form of medicinal or recreational marijuana use.

Illinois

In Illinois, you are allowed up to two and a half ounces of use-able medical marijuana, which can be attained through through dispensaries or caregivers.

Qualifying conditions:

  •  Alzheimer's disease
  •  Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
  •  Arnold Chiari malformation
  •  Cachexia/wasting syndrome
  •  Cancer
  •  Causalgia
  •  Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy
  •  Complex regional pain syndrome type 2
  •  Crohn's Disease
  •  Dystonia
  •  Fibromyalgia
  •  Fibrous dysplasia
  •  Glaucoma
  •  Hepatitis C
  •  HIV/AIDS
  •  Hydrocephalus
  •  Hydromyelia
  •  Interstitial Cystitis
  •  Lupus
  •  Multiple Sclerosis
  •  Muscular Dystrophy
  •  Myasthenia Gravis
  •  Myoclonus
  •  Nail patella syndrome
  •  Neurofibromatosis
  •  Parkinson's disease
  •  Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD)
  •  Rheumatoid Arthritis
  •  Sjogren's syndrome
  •  Spinal cord disease
  •  Spinocerebellar Ataxia (SCA)
  •  Syringomyelia
  •  Tarlov cysts
  •  Tourette's syndrome
  •  Traumatic brain injury and post-concussion syndrome

Indiana

This state currently does not allow any form of medicinal or recreational marijuana use.

Iowa

Medical marijuana is not expressly legal in the state of Iowa, however there is a medical CBD statute in the state. Please see state website for the most up to date information on medical CBD laws.

Qualifying conditions:

● Severe debilitating epileptic conditions as detailed by a physician

Kansas

This state currently does not allow any form of medicinal or recreational marijuana use.

Kentucky

This state currently does not allow any form of medicinal or recreational marijuana use.

Louisiana

This state currently does not allow any form of medicinal or recreational marijuana use.

Maine

In Maine, you are allowed up to two and a half ounces of useable medical marijuana, which can be attained through through dispensaries or caregivers.

Qualifying conditions:

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
  • Cachexia or wasting syndrome
  • Cancer
  • Chronic pain
  • Crohn's disease
  • Epilepsy
  • Glaucoma
  • Hepatitis C
  • HIV or AIDS
  • Huntington's disease
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Nausea
  • Nail-patella syndrome
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

Maryland

In Maryland, you are allowed up to a thirty day supply of useable medical marijuana, which can be attained through through dispensaries or caregivers. Marijuana in edible form is not allowed.

Qualifying conditions:

  •  Cachexia, Anorexia, or Wasting Syndrome
  •  Chronic Pain
  •  Nausea
  •  Seizures
  •  Severe or persistent muscle spasms

Massachusetts

In Massachusetts, you are allowed up to a sixty day supply of useable medical marijuana, which can be attained through through dispensaries or caregivers. Additionally it can be cultivated at home in limited amounts.

Qualifying conditions:

  •  Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
  •  Cancer
  •  Crohn's disease
  • Glaucoma
  •  HIV or AIDS
  •  Hepatitis C
  •  Multiple Sclerosis
  •  Parkinson's disease
  •  Other conditions as determined in writing by a qualifying patient's physician

Michigan

In Michigan, you are allowed up to a two and a half ounces supply of useable medical marijuana, which can be attained through through dispensaries or caregivers. Additionally cultivation of up to 12 plants in a locked indoor or secured non-visible environment.

Qualifying conditions:

  •  Alzheimer's disease
  •  Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
  •  Cachexia or wasting syndrome
  • Cancer
  •  Chronic pain
  •  Crohn's disease
  •  Glaucoma
  •  HIV or AIDS
  •  Hepatitis C
  •  Nail patella
  •  Nausea
  •  Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  •  Seizures
  •  Severe and persistent muscle spasms

Minnesota

In Minnesota, you are allowed up to a 30 day supply of useable medical marijuana, which can be attained through through dispensaries or caregivers, but only non-smokable preparations are allowed.

Qualifying conditions:

  •  Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
  •  Cancer/cachexia
  •  Crohn's disease
  •  Glaucoma
  •  HIV/AIDS
  •  Intractable pain
  •  Seizures
  •  Severe and persistent muscle spasms
  •  Terminal illness
  •  Tourette's Syndrome

Missouri

Medical marijuana is not expressly legal in the state of Missouri, however there is a medical CBD statute in the state. Please see state website for the most up to date information on medical CBD laws.

Qualifying conditions:

● Severe debilitating epileptic conditions as detailed by a physician

Montana

In Montana, you are allowed up to a one ounce supply of useable medical marijuana, which can be attained through through dispensaries or caregivers. Additionally, up two four mature plants may be cultivated at home.

Qualifying conditions:

  •  Cachexia or wasting syndrome
  •  Cancer
  •  Chronic pain
  •  Crohn's disease
  •  Glaucoma
  •  HIV/AIDS
  •  Nausea
  •  Seizures
  •  Severe or persistent muscle spasms

Nebraska

This state currently does not allow any form of medicinal or recreational marijuana use.

Nevada

In Nevada, you are allowed up to two and a half ounces of useable medical marijuana, which can be attained through through dispensaries or caregivers. Additionally, up to twelve mature plants may be cultivated at home, but only if residing further than 25 miles from a legal dispensary.

Qualifying conditions:

  •  AIDS
  •  Cachexia
  •  Cancer
  •  Glaucoma
  •  Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  •  Persistent muscle spasms or seizures
  •  Severe nausea or pain
  •  Other conditions are subject to approval

New Hampshire

In New Hampshire, you are allowed up to two ounces of useable medical marijuana, which can be attained through through dispensaries or caregivers. Additionally, up to four mature plants may be cultivated at home.

Qualifying conditions:

  •  ALS
  •  Alzheimer's disease
  •  Cachexia
  •  Cancer
  •  Chemotherapy induced anorexia
  •  Chronic pancreatitis
  •  Crohn's disease
  •  Elevated intraocular pressure
  •  Epilepsy*
  •  Glaucoma
  •  Hepatitis C (currently receiving antiviral treatment)
  •  HIV/AIDS
  •  Lupus*
  •  Moderate to severe vomiting
  •  Multiple Sclerosis
  •  Muscular Dystrophy
  •  Nausea
  •  Parkinson's disease*
  •  Persistent muscle spasms
  •  Seizures
  •  Severe pain (that has not responded to previously prescribed medication)
  •  Spinal cord injury or disease
  •  Traumatic brain injury
  •  Wasting syndrome

New Jersey

In New Jersey, you are allowed up to two ounces a month of useable medical marijuana, which can be attained through through dispensaries or caregivers.

Qualifying conditions:

  •  Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
  •  Cancer (includes associated chronic pain and/or severe nausea)
  •  Crohn's disease
  •  Glaucoma
  •  HIV/AIDS (includes associated chronic pain and/or severe nausea)
  •  Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)
  •  Multiple Sclerosis
  •  Muscular Dystrophy
  •  Seizure and/or spasticity disorders
  •  Any terminal illness if a doctor has determined the patient will die within a year

New Mexico

In New Mexico, you are allowed up to six ounces or more if authorized by a physician, of useable medical marijuana, which can be attained through through dispensaries or caregivers. Additionally, up to 16 plants, (four mature, 12 immature) may be cultivated at home.

Qualifying conditions:

  •  Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease)
  •  Anorexia/cachexia
  •  Arthritis
  •  Cancer
  •  Cervical dystonia
  •  Chronic pain
  •  Crohn's disease
  •  Epilepsy
  •  Glaucoma
  •  Hepatitis C
  •  HIV/AIDS
  •  Hospice patients
  •  Huntington's disease
  •  Intractable nausea/vomiting
  •  Multiple sclerosis
  •  Painful peripheral neuropathy
  •  Parkinson's disease
  •  Post-traumatic Stress Disorder
  •  Spinal cord damage

New York

In New York, you are allowed up to a 30 day supply of useable medical marijuana, which can be attained through through dispensaries or caregivers, but only non-smokable preparations are allowed.

Qualifying conditions:

  •  Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
  •  Cancer
  •  Epilepsy
  •  HIV/AIDS
  •  Huntington's Disease
  •  Inflammatory bowel disease
  •  Parkinson's Disease
  •  Multiple Sclerosis
  •  Neuropathies
  •  Spinal cord damage

North Carolina

Medical marijuana is not expressly legal in the state of North Carolina, however there is a medical CBD statute in the state. Please see state website for the most up to date information on medical CBD laws.

Qualifying conditions:

● Severe debilitating epileptic conditions as detailed by a physician

North Dakota

This state currently does not allow any form of medicinal or recreational marijuana use.

Ohio

This state currently does not allow any form of medicinal or recreational marijuana use.

Oklahoma

Medical marijuana is not expressly legal in the state of Oklahoma, however there is a medical CBD statute in the state. Please see state website for the most up to date information on medical CBD laws.

Qualifying conditions:

● Severe debilitating epileptic conditions as detailed by a physician

Oregon

In Oregon, you are allowed up to twenty four ounces of useable medical marijuana, which can be attained through through dispensaries or caregivers. Additionally, up to 24 plants, (six mature, 18 immature) may be cultivated at home.

Qualifying conditions:

  •  Alzheimer's disease
  •  Cachexia
  •  Cancer
  •  Chronic pain
  •  Glaucoma
  •  HIV or AIDS
  •  Nausea
  •  Persistent muscle spasms
  •  Post-traumatic stress
  •  Seizures
  •  Other conditions are subject to approval

Pennsylvania

This state currently does not allow any form of medicinal or recreational marijuana use.

Rhode Island

In Rhode Island, you are allowed up to two and a half ounces of useable medical marijuana, which can be attained through through dispensaries or caregivers. Additionally, up to 24 plants, (12 mature, 12 immature) may be cultivated in an indoor facility.

Qualifying conditions:

  •  Alzheimer's Disease
  •  Cachexia
  •  Cancer
  •  Chronic pain
  •  Crohn's disease
  •  Glaucoma
  •  Hepatitis C
  •  HIV/AIDS
  •  Nausea
  •  Persistent muscle spasms
  •  Seizures
  •  Other conditions are subject to approval

South Carolina

Medical marijuana is not expressly legal in the state of South Carolina, however there is a medical CBD statute in the state. Please see state website for the most up to date information on medical CBD laws.

Qualifying conditions:

● Severe debilitating epileptic conditions as detailed by a physician

South Dakota

This state currently does not allow any form of medicinal or recreational marijuana use.

Tennessee

Medical marijuana is not expressly legal in the state of Tennessee, however there is a medical CBD statute in the state. Please see state website for the most up to date information on medical CBD laws.

Qualifying conditions:

● Severe debilitating epileptic conditions as detailed by a physician

Texas

This state currently does not allow any form of medicinal or recreational marijuana use.

Utah

Medical marijuana is not expressly legal in the state of Utah, however there is a medical CBD statute in the state. Please see state website for the most up to date information on medical CBD laws.

Qualifying conditions:

● Severe debilitating epileptic conditions as detailed by a physician

Vermont

In Vermont, you are allowed up to two ounces of useable medical marijuana, which can be attained through through dispensaries or caregivers. Additionally, up to 9 plants, (2 mature, 7 immature) may be cultivated in an indoor facility.

Qualifying conditions:

  •  Cachexia or wasting syndrome
  •  Cancer
  •  HIV or AIDS
  •  Multiple Sclerosis
  •  Seizures
  •  Severe pain
  •  Severe nausea

Virginia

Medical marijuana is not expressly legal in the state of Virginia, however there is a medical CBD statute in the state. Please see state website for the most up to date information on medical CBD laws.

Qualifying conditions:

● Severe debilitating epileptic conditions as detailed by a physician

Washington

Has full legalization with adults 21 and over allowed to possess up to 2 ounces of marijuana for personal use. In addition in Washington, you are allowed up to 48 ounces of marijuana infused product in solid form; 3 ounces of useable medical marijuana; 216 ounces of marijuana-infused product in liquid form; or 21 grams of marijuana concentrates, which can be attained through through dispensaries or caregivers. Additionally, up to 6 plants, may be cultivated in an indoor facility for personal use.

Qualifying conditions:

  •  Cachexia
  •  Cancer
  •  Crohn's disease
  •  Glaucoma
  •  Hepatitis C
  •  HIV or AIDS
  •  Intractable pain
  •  Persistent muscle spasms, and/or spasticity
  •  Nausea
  •  Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
  •  Seizures
  •  Traumatic Brain Injury
  •  Any “terminal or debilitating condition”

West Virginia

This state currently does not allow any form of medicinal or recreational marijuana use.

Wisconsin

Medical marijuana is not expressly legal in the state of Wisconsin, however there is a medical CBD statute in the state. Please see state website for the most up to date information on medical CBD laws.

Qualifying conditions:

● Severe debilitating epileptic conditions as detailed by a physician

Wyoming

Medical marijuana is not expressly legal in the state of Wyoming, however there is a medical CBD statute in the state. Please see state website for the most up to date information on medical CBD laws.

Qualifying conditions:

● Severe debilitating epileptic conditions as detailed by a physician

References:

Adler, J., & Colbert, J. (n.d.). Medicinal Use of Marijuana – Polling Results — NEJM. N Engl J Med 2013; 368:e30May 30, 2013DOI: 10.1056/NEJMclde1305159

Retrieved February 13, 2016, from

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMclde1305159

Cicero, K. (2015, April 22). How Effective Is Medical Marijuana? Here's A Closer Look At 14 Different Uses. Retrieved February 13, 2016, from http://www.prevention.com/health/14-uses-medical-marijuana

Facts & Statistics | Anxiety and Depression Association of America, ADAA. (2014). Retrieved February 13, 2016, from

http://www.adaa.org/about-adaa/press-room/facts-statistics

Fraser, G. A. (2009, February 13). The Use of a Synthetic Cannabinoid in the Management of Treatment-Resistant Nightmares in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Retrieved February 13, 2016, from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1755-5949.2008.00071.x/full

McNamee, D. (2015, July 13). Cannabis Reduces Tumor Growth in Study. Retrieved February 13, 2016, fromhttp://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/279571.php

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (2015) http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/publications/aag/arthritis.htm and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/850145

Pietrangelo, A., & Higuera, V. (2015, March 24). Multiple Sclerosis by the Numbers: Facts, Statistics, and You. Retrieved February 13, 2016, from http://www.healthline.com/health/multiple-sclerosis/facts-statistics-infographic

Medically Reviewed by Steven Kim, MD on March 24, 2015 – See more at:

<href=”#sthash.Kld2RXTD.dpuf” target=”_blank”>http://www.healthline.com/health/multiple-sclerosis/facts-statistics-infographic#sthash.Kld2RXTD.dpuf

Shafer, P. O., RN. (2013, October 10). Epilepsy Statistics. Retrieved February 13, 2016, fromhttp://www.epilepsy.com/learn/epilepsy-statistics

Strohbeck-Kuehner,, P., Skopp, G., & Mattern, R. (2008, March 3). Cannabis Improves Symptoms of ADHD. Retrieved February 13, 2016, from

http://www.cannabis-med.org/english/journal/en_2008_01_1.pdf


 

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